Wood Materials

Our Wood Materials

 

I. Sunglasses

 

Reclaimed East Indian Rosewood 

Also called Black Rosewood, its heartwood varies in color from rose with purple lines to deep purple with black lines. It is a truly beautiful wood with violet purple hues and dark streaks. The darker streaks impart an attractive variation that our artists love to highlight. The wood is fragrant, durable and expensive to work with because of its high density.

 

Reclaimed Cocobolo

Cocobolo heartwood often carries a sunrise of hues--red, yellow, pink, and black -occasionally streaked with green, purple, and blue. In some of the raw wood, a creamy white sapwood borders the colorful heartwood. With age, this wood darkens to orange or reddish-brown in color -often with a lacy pattern of darker irregular lines weaving through the wood.

 

Reclaimed Padauk 

Padauk is a South East Asian tree with reddish wood that has a mottled or striped black grain. All are red when cut, but darken with exposure to light. This is a durable wood with a royal heritage. King Solomon, proverbial for his wisdom in governing the Israelites during the 10th century B.C., must have really known his wood, too. He chose stalwart padauk for the pillars of his temple. French Kings Louis XV and Louis XVI were separated from Solomon by thousands of years. Their royal woodworkers crafted ornate cups and chalices from this Padauk. Now it is used in fine furniture and wooden art, including our WOOED fashion items.

 

Reclaimed Zebrawood

Zebrawood has an exotic look with its unique, colorful, grain. Black and golden lines make this an excellent choice for our fashion items. Zebrawood’s pattern is a lot wavier than most and provides more contrast than  other types of wood. The zebra is the fashion star of the Sahara. With Zebrawood, you can be too!

 

Reclaimed Black Walnut Wood

Walnut wood is the only dark brown domestic species in North America. It offers a very deep and beautiful dark chocolate brown color. Heartwood is a rich chocolate or purplish brown in color, with a dull sheen. Black walnut is normally straight grained and is noted for its beautiful grain character, producing more variation than any other wood. Over the years the wood develops a lustrous patina.

 

Sustainable Bamboo 

Bamboos are fast growing, organic and biodegradable members of the grass family. It needs no replanting, pesticides or fertilizers, and its roots retain water in the watershed, sustaining riverbanks and reducing water pollution. Its lightweight and highly elastic property makes it a lasting and stable material to make fantastic fashionable daily wear.

 

 

II. Bowties

 

Ebony

Ebony (sought after by craftsmen all over the world for its unique color, stability, and fine finish) was cherished like gold in ancient times. Because of its color, durability, hardness, and ability to polish very smoothly, ebony is widely used for cabinetwork, wooden art and musical instrument making (including piano and harpsichord keys etc.). It is expensive to work with and has a tendency to want to split if not shaped with care, but takes a really nice polish that makes it worth the work. The finished product is very durable and is often lauded as the most beautiful of woods.

 

Verawood

Verawood color can range from a pale yellow/olive, to a deeper forest green to dark brown to almost black. The grain has a unique feathered pattern when viewed up close. The color tends to darken with age, especially upon exposure to light. Verawood has a fine texture and closed pores. The bare wood can be polished to a fine luster due to its high natural oil content. The grain tends to be interlocked and tight. This wood is highly fragrant. In fact, its oil of Guaiac (or guayacol) is used as an ingredient in perfumes. This oil is also appreciated for skin healing attributes and the healing of stomach problems.

 

Cocobolo 

Cocobolo heartwood often carries a sunrise of hues--red, yellow, pink, and black -occasionally streaked with green, purple, and blue. In some of the raw wood, a creamy white sapwood borders the colorful heartwood. With age, this wood darkens to orange or reddish-brown in color -often with a lacy pattern of darker irregular lines weaving through the wood.

 

Wenge

Wenge is a tropical timber, very dark in color with a distinctive figure and a strong partridge wood pattern. The heartwood is dark brown, almost black. On the quarter sawn surface, fine pencil-thin, light tan lines interspersed with blackish brown stripes make the surface appear as if it has been stroked by the fine claws of some wild jungle animal. On the tangential surface, the light lines show up as undulating streaks, like waves on the water. Its rich, coffee-colored hue and dark caramel colored vein patterns make Wenge an especially attractive lumber for personal fashion items.